Fiberglas covering model airplanes-Intoductory Page for Fiberglass Cloth for RC models - Fiberglass Cloth Supply and Education

I get it from a company called Thayarcraft. I use their Type cloth. The cloth is very fine and forms readily around curved shapes. Extremely easy to apply. For current pricing, check with Thayercraft Inc.

Fiberglas covering model airplanes

Fiberglas covering model airplanes

Fiberglas covering model airplanes

Fiberglas covering model airplanes

Fiberglas covering model airplanes

John L. Styles to Allow the extra cloth to drape off Fiberglas covering model airplanes part until the resin has cured. WordPress Lightbox. Once all the parts are covered First audition xxx the resin has cured and the cloth has been trimmed, scuff the surfaces with grit sandpaper and apply a second layer of thinned Finishing Resin and allow to cure overnight. Man Subscribe Sidebar. Laying of the glass cloth Now airplannes the tack layer of WBPU is sticky we can apply the glass cloth onto our workpiece and move it into position. After you've trimmed away the excess kodel you may notice that the edges have gone slightly white, this is normal and does happen frequently, Fiberglas covering model airplanes run a small dash of WBPU along the edges, this has two purposes; Seals the edge to prevent glass shards breaking off Adheres the edge to the job. CS finish 50". Plain Fiberglax weave 7 oz fiberglass cloth for parts and mold making.

Relish porn girls. Intoductory Page Fiberglass Cloth RC models

The plane looks great, and is very light. A guide to fiberglassing model aircraft using aidplanes based polyurethane Fiberglassing without epoxy Fiberglassing vovering aircraft is a well known method of adding considerable durability and strength to a given model airframe. If you do have any persistent air bubbles, prick them with a sharp pin and work out the air. To learn what the correct settings are for the film you choose, read the directions that came with Fiberglas covering model airplanes film. Hot Latest. Use a fuel-proof spray paint, dope or polyester resin if coevring model is fuel powered. If you like building engines and bodies for remote-controlled vehicles airplanessthen this will definitely help you out, just by learning how to apply simple fiberglass to the balsa wood parts of the RC airplane body. Seam the front panel along the firewall followed by the back and sides. After the second large side Shorta mack porn trimmed, apply smaller separate pieces to the left and right ends in Fiberglas covering model airplanes same way. Typically there's about a 3 hour wait - go do something else and don't be near the job, else you'll probably bump into it or stirr up dust which will leave the surface all dirty. It gives a smoother finish and is easy to work round wingtips etc.

Located in High Point, NC.

  • I get it from a company called Thayarcraft.
  • Which covering material you select will be based on numerous factors, including the following; Fuel proofing Weight Strength Colour availability Pricing Note that even with the same covering there can be a reasonable deviation in the weight per metre square due to the mass of the pigments in the material, different colours have different weights.
  • Fiberglassing model aircraft is a well known method of adding considerable durability and strength to a given model airframe.
  • Check out this five-part video tutorial on how to use fiberglass finish over balsa wood for RC airplanes.

Fiberglassing model aircraft is a well known method of adding considerable durability and strength to a given model airframe. A lot of people would like to apply fiberglass to their model aircraft but are either not willing to part with the cash involved to pay for a good epoxy resin system or simply cannot use epoxy for reasons of health, ie allergic reactions to the various catalysts used.

Fortunately you can still use fiberglass for a lot of items without having to use epoxy resin. Water based polyurethane paints are very cheap, have a good shelf life can come in a wide variety of colours and have very low toxicity, especially compared to epoxy. So, what is water based polyurethane? It's quite simply what you know as water based paint, sold in all hardware stores and a lot of larger supermarkets and stores. Due to the massive variety of brands, it's suggested that you trial various types until you find one that you're happy with.

For the purpose of this article we'll be using Cabots Crystal Clear. Okay, so let's get going and do some fiberglassing! To be utterly honest, there's not a lot to detail here, using WBPU makes things very easy and can be conducted at a fairly relaxed pace, so first up there's no need to rush. If you've never done fiberglassing before then consider doing a simple piece to start with, rather than risk your entire model aircraft. Perhaps try glass a simple curved canopy or curved block of wood. Start painting on your WBPU to the workpiece, starting from the center and working your way out, smoothing down the glass as you go.

Now is where you learn why we waited for the initial tack coat to become tacky before applying the glass, for if you had not your glass cloth would now be sliding everywhere as you try to paint on the WBPU. In the case of the Cabots crystal clear WBPU, when applying it is of a milkshake consistency and a diluted milky colour. Although WBPU dries to be fairly light, we should still attempt to remove what excess we can. The process of removing excess WBPU additionally assists in the saturation of the glass cloth due to the pressuring effect when using a squeegee.

There are many things you can use as a squeegee, a lot of people like a discarded credit-card. Again, working from the center of the job, using light pressure, scrape away the excess WBPU, the cloth weave should show up distinctly after the squeegee has passed over. Watch out for excess paint building up in beads on the sides and undersides of the job.

Make sure also that the glass is remaining stuck to the workpiece. Quite often they go away with another couple of coats. Don't go overboard though else you'll start cutting into the glass cloth and make things worse. Again, as with the first coat, start appling the WBPU from the center and working your way out. If you are sparse with your application you will probably find you don't need to squeegee off any excess but do watch out for dribbles or beading on the sides of the job.

At this point it's a matter of personal preference and experience. After you've trimmed away the excess glass you may notice that the edges have gone slightly white, this is normal and does happen frequently, simply run a small dash of WBPU along the edges, this has two purposes; Seals the edge to prevent glass shards breaking off Adheres the edge to the job All finished.

If you wish to make a comment or suggestion, please send an email to pldaniels gmail. A guide to fiberglassing model aircraft using water based polyurethane Fiberglassing without epoxy Fiberglassing model aircraft is a well known method of adding considerable durability and strength to a given model airframe. Prepare your workpiece The better you can prepare the surface of what you are glassing, the better the finish will be.

Glassing will not magically fill out dents, so if you have any then now is the time to fill them in. Sand back your surface with at least grit before considering to glass it. Secure the workpiece There's many really good ways to make an utter mess of your hard work, not securing it while you glass is high on that list. If your item is not secured there's a very good chance that it'll fall over and land right into the thick of grit, muck and dust - which will of course totally ruin it.

Cut fiberglass to size Cut your fiberglass slightly oversize for your job, typically allowing up to 20mm all around is a good idea. If you cut it too close you may find that the cloth will start to pull its threads out use pinking shears if you have them to assit in preventing thread pulling.

Prime the surface Because balsa is porous and WBPU is water-based there is a strong absorption factor. Excess absorption of WBPU means excess weight which is something we don't want in nearly all cases. Apply the 'tacking' layer When glassing with epoxy, a lot of people apply some sort of spray on adhesive to the glass or worksurface to make the glass cloth stick.

Do not attempt to apply the glass before the WBPU has gone tacky else the glass cloth will simply slide around and cause you frustrations.

Laying of the glass cloth Now that the tack layer of WBPU is sticky we can apply the glass cloth onto our workpiece and move it into position.

Depending on the particular brand and variety of water based polyurethane that you used there will be a period of time to wait before the next coat can be applied, in other words, read the instructions on the can of paint, don't just assume. Typically there's about a 3 hour wait - go do something else and don't be near the job, else you'll probably bump into it or stirr up dust which will leave the surface all dirty. Trimming and sealing Trimming your job is best done with a very sharp knife, the sharper the better.

Try to cut from the outside to inside, that is, the handle of the blade should be on the glass side of the workpiece as you cut through, this help prevents the glass pulling away from the job. After you've trimmed away the excess glass you may notice that the edges have gone slightly white, this is normal and does happen frequently, simply run a small dash of WBPU along the edges, this has two purposes; Seals the edge to prevent glass shards breaking off Adheres the edge to the job.

Repeat this for the leading edge. My first efforts with glass have looked pretty bad. Some of them were learned from the books listed below:. Recent Articles. Don't go overboard though else you'll start cutting into the glass cloth and make things worse.

Fiberglas covering model airplanes

Fiberglas covering model airplanes

Fiberglas covering model airplanes

Fiberglas covering model airplanes

Fiberglas covering model airplanes. Preparation Prior to Covering

Apply just enough pressure to cut only the film and not the balsa under it. The tips are covered in opaque white. If you are doing a one-color covering job, cover the tips first so that the wing film will overlap them.

On the Tiger , start with the bottom of the tip and then cover the top. Tack the film on the high point or spar position of the top of the end rib and then stretch and seal down that rib to the trailing edge. Repeat this for the leading edge.

Then, beginning at the same spar location, stretch the film down and seal it to the outer edges of the tip. When done, carefully shrink it and trim off the excess. Repeat this for the top of the tip, making sure to overlap the bottom, and you have one tip done. Tips take time but the reward is worth it. To cover the remaining curved portions of white near the tip and wing center, make a cardboard pattern to fit the space. Add some extra film on the non-curved edges. When done, cut out 8 pieces of opaque white film.

For attaching the white panels, a trim iron again comes in handy. Keeping the seam small, tack at the lowest point of the curve and pull and seal down to the trailing edge overlapping the yellow slightly. Then finish the curve. Next seal down the center seam as well as the top edge. Finally, smooth out wrinkles, pushing out air bubbles and close up the seam at bottom. Shrink the panel with a gun or iron. If using a heat gun a delicate touch is required. Cover up the yellow panel next to it with a piece of cardboard or a damp cloth to avoid burning it.

Cotton is used to work out any air bubbles. Repeat this process for all the panels. When done, you can apply Top Flite MonoKote Trim Solvent with a small swab to seal the edge between the white and yellow film.

The bottom side is done first so that the top film overlaps it. The film is attached along the spar line, tacking it first at the center and then stretching and sealing down to the tip, taking care to keep the line straight. The leading edge is tacked in the center of the wing panel and tacked and stretched at one inch intervals in both directions.

When done, all edges are sealed down and the panel is shrunk and the excess trimmed off using a straight edge.

Cover both bottom panels and then both top panels. The wing is now completely covered in yellow and white film. All that remains is to attach the red trim. This adds an additional seal to help fuel-soaked areas resist the oil. Wipe up any excess solvent quickly with a dry paper towel to protect the finish. The next step is to cover the control surfaces.

This process can be tedious but is necessary for a good final product. The pieces are then covered in transparent yellow using the same process we used for the wing; bottom first, top last. If possible, cover all of one color such as yellow and then clean the covering and trim irons before switching to a second color. Irons pick up color from the film. Cleaning irons between colors helps avoid yellow or red smears across your snowy white film.

Use Ironex to clean the irons when they are cold. Remember to avoid fumes. It is time to cover the fuselage. Before covering the fuselage, paint the engine compartment using a paint color that matches the film near it.

Use a fuel-proof spray paint, dope or polyester resin if the model is fuel powered. The Tiger is an electric and was sprayed with non-fuel-proof white spray paint. On a two-color scheme like the Tiger , plan ahead on the fuselage so that you cover dark over light, opaque over transparent, from bottom to top, and back to front.

On the Tiger , the opaque white is on the nose with a stripe running down to the tail. The remainder of the fuselage will be transparent yellow with some red trim. The bottom front and rear of the fuselage are covered first. Seam the front panel along the firewall followed by the back and sides. Shrink and trim off the excess. On the bottom rear fuselage, seam it aft of the wing and stretch and form a V to the tail.

Then tack down and seal the sides. Shrink it and trim off any excess using a steel rule. To cover the fuselage sides, seal the fuselage at the nose then pull and form a V back to the tail.

Then tack and seal down the sides starting at about the wing saddle and the cockpit working fore and aft in both directions. Seal the edges and trim the film. The top film on the fuselage is added last finishing off the transparent yellow film covering on the fuselage.

The first step in applying the white film to the fuselage is to attach the rear portion of the white side strip over the yellow.

The white nose portion then overlaps the rear side strip. Spray a light coat of Windex on the plastic, align the white film where you want it, and squeegee out the excess Windex with a credit card. Then clean up or work out any remaining Windex with a tissue.

Pushing the credit card rather than dragging it works better and the edge of it can be used quite effectively to nudge pieces of film into place. If you do have any persistent air bubbles, prick them with a sharp pin and work out the air. Let one side dry over night before doing the other side or you may regret it. If it overlaps an edge, such as the leading or trailing edge, tack the film to that edge with a trim iron.

When the film is dry you can use very low heat on a covering iron to set the adhesive in the trim film and then seal the edges with trim solvent. If a piece does not look right when dried, it can usually be easily lifted, sprayed and repositioned. Align the cut film to the stripe and tack it.

Then, stretch it carefully and tack along the edges of the nose. Shrink it with an iron or a heat gun. The red film trim strip was applied with Windex in the same manner as the white side stripe it overlaps.

For the white and red film on the fin and stabilizer, cardboard patterns were made and the white film was then applied using the Windex method. The cardboard patterns for the curves were made easily with help from a Hobbico circle cutter. All red trim was applied using Windex, the adhesive set with an iron at low heat, and then sealed using trim solvent.

Here are some tips: Use a new, sharp hobby razor blade. Make sure the pattern is smooth so the knife blade will not hang up on it. Tape one side of the pattern down and, while keeping pressure on the pattern, cut the un-taped edge in one smooth, continuous motion.

Without moving the pattern, put tape to the other side of the pattern, remove the original tape and cut the remaining side. When cured, you can trim away the cloth and resin from the edges by rubbing it with grit sandpaper. You can then cover the other side of the Sub-Wing with another piece of fiberglass cloth. Set aside and let dry overnight. After the second large side is trimmed, apply smaller separate pieces to the left and right ends in the same way.

Allow to cure and trim away the waste cloth with grit sandpaper. The front part of the Sub-Wing is covered with a single piece of cloth draped over both the top and bottom surfaces. Apply resin along the leading edge and then onto them top and bottom surfaces. Allow the extra cloth to drape off the part until the resin has cured.

Sand through the cloth and resin along the sharp edges and it will cut through the cloth so the waste part drops free.

Sand at a sharp angle to the edge and the resin filled fiberglass cloth will fall away without much wood being exposed. Sandpaper is the tool to use. As with the main part of the Sub-Wing, the front piece ends are covered with separate pieces of cloth.

Use the same techniques as shown above. Mix small batches and if you have any left over, go on and use it to cover other parts. You can also use the resin to fuel proof engine and fuel tank compartments. No sense in throwing away perfectly good mixed resin. Maximize your usage buy thinking ahead and preparing the parts of your model needing finishing. When sanding the resin beads along the sharp edges, use a metal sanding bar for a smooth straight, edge.

Once all the parts are covered and the resin has cured and the cloth has been trimmed, scuff the surfaces with grit sandpaper and apply a second layer of thinned Finishing Resin and allow to cure overnight. Stay tuned as we will soon be priming and painting parts of the Fokker Triplane! Afterwards you can clean up with mild soap and water. Thank you for the detail of your instructions. I am weeks away from my first attempt at applying fiberglass to a model.

I am building a dummy wing section to practice on first and will apply your tips. Thanks again. My first efforts with glass have looked pretty bad.

Great stuff! You can do this using Minwax water based Polyurethane too. No need to wait overnight for it to cure. The one thing to keep in mind is that the WB poly can warp the wood, so you need to seal it first by dry brushing the poly into the wood, let it dry, lightly sand it, and apply a second seal coat. Then you can apply the glass and poly and have it done in a few hours. Then you can apply a few coats of sanding primer, wet sand it smooth and apply the finish. I used latex paint on my Top Flight Corsair, let it dry a few weeks, then top coated with automotive clear coat.

The plane looks great, and is very light. Techniques are the same, but saves a lot of time. This article is very informing. The graduation markings are closer together as the cup taper becomes wider making the portions equal in volume.

One portion epoxy part A, one portion epoxy part B and one portion denatured alcohol. Thanks, Paul. Thanks for a well written tutorial. Your email address will not be published. Do you have a video to share with Model Airplane News? Submit your video here. Profile Data. In an effort to better serve you, our reader, and ensure a rich and relevant experience please help us by completing this Airplane interest profile.

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I get it from a company called Thayarcraft. I use their Type cloth. The cloth is very fine and forms readily around curved shapes. Extremely easy to apply. For current pricing, check with Thayercraft Inc. Green Dr. Start by cutting the cloth to size. Above are the two halves of the Sub-Wing Structure. I have sanded it smooth and added filler to any dings and large seams.

A quick wipe with a tack cloth makes it ready for the Fiberglass cloth. I use throw-away mixing cups. A scrap of balsa makes a handy stirring stick. Just use a clean cup and plenty of paper towels.

Drape the cloth over the part and apply a thin strip of resin down the center. Apply a second strip of resin 90 degrees to the first. This starts spreading the cloth out for a smooth finish. Now add two diagonal strips of resin so you have a Union Jack pattern shown above. This smooths out wrinkles and loose patches. This seals the wood. Now set the part aside on top of some blocks to lift it off the workbench and let the resin cure overnight.

When cured, you can trim away the cloth and resin from the edges by rubbing it with grit sandpaper. You can then cover the other side of the Sub-Wing with another piece of fiberglass cloth. Set aside and let dry overnight. After the second large side is trimmed, apply smaller separate pieces to the left and right ends in the same way. Allow to cure and trim away the waste cloth with grit sandpaper.

The front part of the Sub-Wing is covered with a single piece of cloth draped over both the top and bottom surfaces. Apply resin along the leading edge and then onto them top and bottom surfaces. Allow the extra cloth to drape off the part until the resin has cured. Sand through the cloth and resin along the sharp edges and it will cut through the cloth so the waste part drops free.

Sand at a sharp angle to the edge and the resin filled fiberglass cloth will fall away without much wood being exposed. Sandpaper is the tool to use. As with the main part of the Sub-Wing, the front piece ends are covered with separate pieces of cloth. Use the same techniques as shown above. Mix small batches and if you have any left over, go on and use it to cover other parts. You can also use the resin to fuel proof engine and fuel tank compartments.

No sense in throwing away perfectly good mixed resin. Maximize your usage buy thinking ahead and preparing the parts of your model needing finishing. When sanding the resin beads along the sharp edges, use a metal sanding bar for a smooth straight, edge.

Once all the parts are covered and the resin has cured and the cloth has been trimmed, scuff the surfaces with grit sandpaper and apply a second layer of thinned Finishing Resin and allow to cure overnight. Stay tuned as we will soon be priming and painting parts of the Fokker Triplane! Afterwards you can clean up with mild soap and water. Thank you for the detail of your instructions.

I am weeks away from my first attempt at applying fiberglass to a model. I am building a dummy wing section to practice on first and will apply your tips.

Thanks again. My first efforts with glass have looked pretty bad. Great stuff! You can do this using Minwax water based Polyurethane too. No need to wait overnight for it to cure. The one thing to keep in mind is that the WB poly can warp the wood, so you need to seal it first by dry brushing the poly into the wood, let it dry, lightly sand it, and apply a second seal coat.

Then you can apply the glass and poly and have it done in a few hours. Then you can apply a few coats of sanding primer, wet sand it smooth and apply the finish. I used latex paint on my Top Flight Corsair, let it dry a few weeks, then top coated with automotive clear coat.

The plane looks great, and is very light. Techniques are the same, but saves a lot of time. This article is very informing. The graduation markings are closer together as the cup taper becomes wider making the portions equal in volume. One portion epoxy part A, one portion epoxy part B and one portion denatured alcohol. Thanks, Paul. Thanks for a well written tutorial. Your email address will not be published. Do you have a video to share with Model Airplane News? Submit your video here.

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Fiberglas covering model airplanes